Last edited by Mozuru
Thursday, May 21, 2020 | History

7 edition of Taking Cancer to School (Special Kids in School Series) found in the catalog.

Taking Cancer to School (Special Kids in School Series)

by Kim Gosselin

  • 328 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Jayjo Books .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Oncology,
  • Juvenile Fiction,
  • Children"s Books/Ages 4-8 Nonfiction,
  • Social Issues - Special Needs,
  • Children: Grades 3-4,
  • Patients,
  • Juvenile literature,
  • Cancer,
  • Health & Daily Living - General

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsKaren Schader (Editor), Tom Dineen (Illustrator)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages32
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9740981M
    ISBN 101891383116
    ISBN 109781891383113
    OCLC/WorldCa48508160

    Taking care of a cancer patient is one of the hardest jobs anyone can do. You’re asked to manage medications, set up and get your loved one to appointments, communicate with the health care team, make meals, be the patient’s main emotional support The list . About this Book Chemotherapy and You is written for you—someone who. is about to receive or is now receiving chemotherapy for cancer. Your family, friends, and others close to you may Î Destroy cancer cells that have come back (recurrent cancer) or spread to other parts of your body (metastatic cancer). 2.

      Five books to read before starting medical school but she is also a terminally ill cancer patient. This book describes her journey "as a patient through a doctor's eyes", and is therefore Author: Alexandra Abel. Teaching children about cancer: Older Children. We have stated in several places that this book is intended for children between the ages of two and six. However, parents are already asking us if they can use Someone I Love Is Sick with older children. There is certainly no reason why you should not use this book with younger school-age.

    Breast cancer prevention starts with healthy habits — such as limiting alcohol and staying active. Understand how to reduce your breast cancer risk. If you're concerned about developing breast cancer, you might be wondering if there are steps you can take to help prevent breast cancer. Some risk factors, such as family history, can't be changed.   “Throughout Elena’s fight with cancer, school represented everything she loved; while everyone treated her differently at the hospital, at school, she was just Elena,” Keith said.


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Taking Cancer to School (Special Kids in School Series) by Kim Gosselin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Each book includes a Kids' Quiz to reinforce new information and Ten Tips for Teachers to provide additional facts and ideas for teacher use. In Taking Cancer to School, Max is diagnosed with leukemia.

This straightforward story may help to alleviate some of the concern that accompanies the diagnosis of childhood cancer/5(2). Taking Cancer to School book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Max is diagnosed with leukemia. This straightforward story m /5.

Grade level: Pre-K This book is part of The Special Kids in School Series and is a must-have for every counselor, teacher, school nurse, parent, or caregiver. This beautifully illustrated and fun-to-read storybook tells the story of Max, a kid living with : Child Therapy Toys. Taking Cancer to School Book Unknown Binding – See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Unknown Binding, "Please retry" — — — The Amazon Book Review Author interviews, book reviews, editors' picks, and more.

Format: Unknown Binding, Get this from a library. Taking cancer to school. [Cynthia S Henry; Kim Gosselin; Tom Dineen] -- Uses a simple story about a young boy to present information on cancer. Written by Cynthia S. Henry and Kim Gosselin and illustrated by Tom Dineen, this book is part of The Special Kids in School Series and is a must-have for every counselor, teacher, school nurse, parent, or caregiver.

This beautifully illustrated and fun-to-read storybook tells the story of Brand: ChildsWork/ChildsPlay. Taking Cancer to School We are no longer accepting any general public orders for infection control or COVID related supplies. We have limited stock for certain products and are imposing order restrictions on some : The Guidance Group.

Teach children to empathize with peers who have cancer Help children with autism or similar conditions feel safe and accepted Includes a quiz for students and tips for teachers Grades: Pre-K-3 Written by Cynthia S.

Henry and Kim Gosselin and illustrated by Tom Dineen, this book is part of The Special Kids in School Series and is a must-have for.

Taking Cancer to School Book. By: Cynthia S. Henry and Kim Gosselin Illustrated by: Tom Dineen. Grade level: Pre-K This book is part of The Special Kids in School Series and is a must-have for every counselor, teacher, school nurse, parent, or caregiver.

Taking Cancer to School-This book is a heartfelt story of a young child with cancer. The story explains the child’s treatments and their side effects and how the young patient can still learn his school work. This book is best used for ages Cop. Taking Cancer to School-Grade level: Pre-K This book is part of The Special Kids in School Series and is a must-have for every counselor, teacher, school nurse, parent, or caregiver.

This beautifully illustrated and fun-to-read storybook tells the. Taking Charge of Cancer is a different type of book for cancer patients-one that goes beyond the cancer information that is currently available, allowing you to truly take control of your cancer treatment.

You'll learn how to obtain and understand medical records, and /5(25). People respond to cancer in many ways. This book was written to help you learn from other people with cancer.

Many people have helped write this book—patients, their family members, and friends. You will see their comments in all sections of the book. Finding out how others respond to cancer might help you understand your own feelings. And File Size: 1MB. Taking Care of Your “Girls” Dr. Weiss and her year-old daughter, Isabel, have co-authored Taking Care of Your “Girls:” A Breast Health Guide for Girls, Teens, and In-Betweens, published by Random talk candidly about breast development and breast health — separating myths from facts and detailing everyday steps to improve breast health and reduce breast cancer risk over.

Before her death from cancer inTrish Greene, Ph.D., was the senior vice president of Patient Services at The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. She was devoted to patient services for cancer patients and created the Back-to-School program.

Her devotion to patients and their families will never be. Whether you or someone you love has cancer, knowing what to expect can help you cope. From basic information about cancer and its causes to in-depth information on specific cancer types – including risk factors, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment options – you’ll find it here.

Books shelved as cancer: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult. Like with most life-altering, traumatic, and generally difficult situations, gathering information is the best plan of action post-diagnosis.

The below books offer priceless information on everything from navigating an onslaught of medical and healthcare-related confusion, to coping with the unbearable and inevitable grief that comes with losing a loved one.

To round out the list, we asked Dr. Overall, I think this would be a beneficial book for children going through chemotherapy. It is upbeat and positive, without getting into too much detail.

I found it interesting that the book never mentions the word “cancer”. H is for Hairy Fairy by Kim Martin. This book is a simple alphabet book for kids (and even adults) going through cancer.

Cancer doctor writes book after his best friend’s diagnosis. In Taking Charge of Cancer: that they didn’t go to medical school. But they don’t need to know about all kinds of cancer. Taking Cancer to School.

Cynthia Henry & Kim Gosselin, $ (ages ) Talking with My Treehouse Friends about Cancer: an Activity Book for Children of Parents with Cancer. Peter van Deroot, illustrated by Gail Kohler Opsahl, $ (ages 6 to 9) We Get It: Voices of .Caregiver is defined here as the person who most often helps the person with cancer and is not paid to do so.

In most cases, the main (primary) caregiver is a spouse, partner, parent, or an adult child. When family is not around, close friends, co-workers, or neighbors may fill this role. The caregiver has a key role in the patient’s care.TAKING ON PROSTATE CANCER by Andy Grove with reporter associate Bethany McLean: My secretary's face appeared in the conference room window.

I could see from her look that it was the call I was expecting. I excused myself and bolted out of the room. When I stepped outside, she confirmed that my urologist was on the phone. I ran back to my office.